The Precedent

Filed under News

With anti-semitism on the rise nationally, English classes trying to combat hate with literature

Students+work+on+analyzing+fallacies+in+Nazi+propaganda+in+English+Class.
Back to Article
Back to Article

With anti-semitism on the rise nationally, English classes trying to combat hate with literature

Students work on analyzing fallacies in Nazi propaganda in English Class.

Students work on analyzing fallacies in Nazi propaganda in English Class.

Damien Tippett

Students work on analyzing fallacies in Nazi propaganda in English Class.

Damien Tippett

Damien Tippett

Students work on analyzing fallacies in Nazi propaganda in English Class.

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Literature is the key to learning different aspects of life, including the past. With Nazi hate symbols and nationwide controversy, history seems to be going in a cycle of reflecting its past into the present.

From Wisconsin High’s picture of student saluting to swastikas being painted around the valley, these events are shaping the society future generations must look forward to. Therefore, these occurrences are negatively influencing the standards in which upcoming youth must accept.

According to AZ Family on Channel 3, there has been a 37 percent increase in Jewish hate crimes nationally in the past year.

Sophomore Ainsleigh Cardone says, “The human race has not learned that it is not okay to kill someone,” she goes on to explain, “with advances in technology, such as guns and weapons, it’s coming to a more extreme.”

In contrast, novels like The Book Thief, which are being taught among many high school classes on campus, are coming to life.

This book shed light to worldwide issues, and draw connections between the past and present.

These Nazi symbols that are being posed within society are going against what students are being taught to respect.

As a result, divides among people and society expand and culture is brought back to where is started. By teaching students about the effects these hate symbols have had, it can aid the future generations in understanding how to accept and learn from not only past history, but people as individuals.

Sophomore, Harry Tilzer states, “We should be able to peacefully express ourselves, before we have to forcefully express ourselves.”

These events shape the future of standards and morale among society. Although people are entitled to their opinions, respect is one of the foundations of freedom within America. If students aren’t made aware of current events, then history could be erased.

English and yearbook teacher, Erika Stueber states, “We never want to forget what happened. In order to learn from our past, we need to educate ourselves.”

Through teachings within The Book Thief, students learn about the life of many who grew up in a time where Nazi propaganda was influenced in people’s daily lives.

By drawing these comparisons and contrasting life from then to now, there are many hopes that these events will surpass as students become more knowledgeable on what is happening around them.

Sophomore, Carter Dicher reflects back to Martin Luther King explaining, “We need to repeat that part of history, instead of the bad part of history.”

With the resurfacing of Nazi salutes and swastikas, teachers are now seeing more of an urgency to teach lessons derived from novels like The Book Thief. Because many are unaware of certain precautions regarding the motives of these actions, the growing generation will not be taught the necessary tools involved in aiding them as a human within society.

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About the Contributors
Sydney Wolfe, Staff Reporter

Sydney Wolfe is a senior staff reporter and editor. Being the Co-News Editor, ECON/DECA/Business reporter, and a feature writing, writing is a passion...

Nadine Loureiro, Staff Reporter

Nadine Loureiro is a sophomore and is in her first year of journalism. She is excited to write about the English department, clubs, and book reviews. When...

Damien Tippett, Adviser

Damien Tippett is in his 11th year as adviser to the Precedent student newspaper. In addition to the newspaper, Tippett also teaches sophomore English...

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
Navigate Right
The student voice of Perry High School
With anti-semitism on the rise nationally, English classes trying to combat hate with literature